Traumatic brain injury can happen due to a blow to the head, such as what often occurs during a car crash. In addition to falls and incidents where an object struck someone, car accidents number among the top causes of TBI.

In the case of moderate trauma, noticing symptoms and getting the right diagnosis can take some time. It is important to know common warning signs and get a comprehensive medical checkup, even if you saw a doctor in the emergency room.

Know why you may not immediately know you sustained TBI

If you were in an auto crash, you may have sustained TBI even if you do not remember hitting your head at all, especially if you were traveling fast when the accident happened. The sudden halt can cause internal damage as the brain impacts the interior of the skull. TBI can also cause a brief loss of consciousness and some memory confusion. Thus, a person may remain unaware of having sustained a blow; in the absence of outward signs of trauma, responders may also remain unaware. 

Continue watching for symptoms

Signs of TBI can appear as long as several weeks after the accident. Therefore, it is important to pay close attention to changes in your health and emotional state, as they could herald more serious problems. Typical signs of TBI include lack of coordination, dizziness, blurred vision, ringing in the ears, difficulty focusing, headaches, drowsiness, irritability and speech problems. Depending on the area of the brain that sustained damage, you may experience a few or many of these symptoms; some people may experience other types of changes. Because you were in an accident, do not write off even minor changes; see a doctor, letting him or her know about your medical history, including the crash.

Get help

Recovery from TBI can be a difficult journey that tends to focus more on recovering functionality rather than finding a cure. TBI can affect a person’s ability to work, socialize and perform daily functions. You may be legally able to obtain compensation to help you offset the often-burdensome costs of the condition.